Goodbye tumblr

We had some fun times but I’m afraid I need to be going now.
It’s not you, it’s me. You’re great, so cool and exciting, so simple and fun.
If I’m honest though a bit too much cooler than me. I mean I don’t know how to make a gif, I’m not even sure I really know how to pronounce gif.

So I’m going somewhere else, it just makes sense. I’ll leave you to the cool kids and the hipsters.

I’ve found a way to take the tumblogs I like with me, so I won’t be completely out of touch.
So long tumblr.

newsweek
newsweek:

fastcompany:

It’s called a lilac chaser. You’ve seen it before. It’s an optical illusion with a small black cross in the middle, encircled by twelve blurry lilac-colored dots. A green dot animates over the lilacs as though counting the time on a futuristic clock. Stare at the cross long enough and the lilacs disappear, one by one. But the moment you get distracted and look away, the lilacs come back.
The black cross is the work you do. The lilacs are all the things ancillary to your work. They’re the small choices you’ve made around your black cross: the time you wake up, the tools you use, what you have for breakfast, when you check your email, and so on. They’re the various aspects of a daily routine—things that, when fixed in place, disappear with the passage of time.
How your habits become productivity-draining distractions

Whoa.


Very interesting.  Keep looking at the cross.
newsweek:

fastcompany:

It’s called a lilac chaser. You’ve seen it before. It’s an optical illusion with a small black cross in the middle, encircled by twelve blurry lilac-colored dots. A green dot animates over the lilacs as though counting the time on a futuristic clock. Stare at the cross long enough and the lilacs disappear, one by one. But the moment you get distracted and look away, the lilacs come back.

The black cross is the work you do. The lilacs are all the things ancillary to your work. They’re the small choices you’ve made around your black cross: the time you wake up, the tools you use, what you have for breakfast, when you check your email, and so on. They’re the various aspects of a daily routine—things that, when fixed in place, disappear with the passage of time.

How your habits become productivity-draining distractions

Whoa.

Very interesting. Keep looking at the cross.

I’m not

“I’m not a youth worker”. For about 10 years that was one of my repeated lines. I was part of a big church where there were other people capable, and better at reaching the young. So I let them do it, and focussed on other things.

Now in a way there’s nothing wrong with that. There is only so much time any of us have and it makes a lot of sense to focus on the things God has called us to, that match our skills and passion.

Except that then God called me to youth work. My wife and I moved churches and our new job involved overseeing youth work. There were still extremely capable people doing the work too, but I was with them, and leading them.

We were there for the last couple of years (just left), and it’s been a blast! I discovered I loved getting to know young people, and seeing God move in their lives, and I realised I was quite good at aspects of it.

I also realised I could have learnt all that earlier, if I’d just not said “I’m not…”

What do you claim you’ll never be? How would you finish the sentence I’m not… ?

Mayer wants to create a complete profile of everything you love, which will result in more personalized content—and more lucrative ads surrounding it.

From Fast Company

Yahoo! is slowly buying up sites I love and use.  Flickr, Tumblr, Astrid.

Should I be excited, sacred or indifferent?
I suppose its promising that I like what they’ve just done with Flickr.

Keep Trying

I wrote a couple of days ago about our current missional community, and how great it is.

I’ve been reflecting this week about the communities we’ve been part of.   In the last ten years or so Helen have led 4 communities.  Each has lasted a few years, all of them ended;  some well,  some more painfully.

Each community had a good life,  and in each we found some brilliant collaborators, many of whom are still good friends.

Here’s the thing though,  I think each one worked a little better than the one before,  I certainly think we got better at leading them.

I know a few people who have been part of communities and have found that its got difficult, or failed in some way.  That’s normal,  these things are hard work.   What is sad though is that for some that is their only experience of belonging in, or leading a community.

That’s a great shame,  because I think you get better each time you have a go.  Which means your next community will be stronger than your last.

Perhaps you lead a church or network of missional communities. How do you help your people get back into the game after a perceived death or failure of a community?

Maybe you’ve been part of a community but have backed off since things got tough.  Is it time to get back on it and have another go?

Maybe you have no idea what all this is about,  if that’s the case you can either move on,  or check out Missional Communities UK, who will tell you about something that is a lot of fun!

Imagine

Imagine has been our missional community for (almost) two years. We started it with a BBQ in October in our garden. I used our new Weber and smoke went everywhere then the sun set and it got dark much quicker than I expected so everyone stumbled around in our unfamiliar garden.

We committed to being a community that showed God’s love to young adults. We also committed to functioning like an extended family to one another.

We ate a lot, went camping a few times, set up a monthly acoustic night, spent a fair bit of time in pubs, read the bible, worshipped and prayed.

A lot of this has happened in our lounge and made it feel a bit like a holy place.

We’ve seen about 45 people be part of it. Some have left to get jobs (praise God) others are students who plug back in over the hols, others are going to carry the vision on after we have gone.

It’s been such a pleasure being part of it and leading it. We’ve loved learning with our community and seeing many of them being profoundly shaped by God as they find somewhere to belong. It’s been amazing seeing some of them discover God for the first time.

Tonight was our final BBQ with the community before we go. Actually it rained all evening so we had barbecue style food cooked inside. Then they all prayed for us as a family. One really cool thing was that for our last night there were new people who we didn’t know, just starting to connect in with what’s going on.

There is cost to being extended-family-on mission. One cost is that it hurts when God calls you to go. But it’s worth it. Being part of a missional community is so much fun!

Imagine, you are collectively and individually amazing! We Askews love you. We’ll be watching how you continue to get better and grow on your adventures with God.

Despite rumours about the return of guitars at the start of the year, 2013 is turning out to be a great year for the kind of music I love.

There is some ace new stuff from James Blake and Bonobo plus a brilliant return from Daft Punk.
But it’s these guys I’m most excited about. Here’s their new single and suitably odd video.

What are you listening to?